By Andrea Willige Ask most people what ‘industrial’ means to them, and it’s likely to be the image of giant ladles pouring hot molten metal into a giant oven. Nothing embodies large scale manufacturing more poignantly than steelmaking in a blast furnace.
Last year 15 catastrophic weather and climate events struck, destroying property, uprooting people’s lives in the United States, causing more than $15 billion in damages. Devastating natural disasters also rolled across the globe. Earthquakes hit northeast of Rome in January and in Ecuador last spring. The devastation is unimaginable. People are left without running water or electricity for weeks on end. Hospitals and schools are closed. Water treatment centers shuttered. Power is one of the most important things needed to move down the path of recovery.
Early on a rainy February morning, on the seaside launch pad of a remote Japanese island, Mitsubishi H-IIA rocket No. 30 is awaiting its rendezvous with destiny. Once successfully placed into orbit, a satellite began its mission in space while far below the rocket launch team celebrated yet another in a growing list of successful launches.
Operating a forklift is demanding work, but the safety, reliability and other enhancements of modern models make them far superior to the machines of even a generation ago. Like those of M-FET group (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Forklift, Engine & Turbocharger Holdings), which offers a range of products that apply the best technologies and design ideas that the history of forklift development has to offer. This includes the reliable engine and powertrains of Mitsubishi forklifts, tried and true batteries and components from Nichiyu forklifts, and the heavy-duty capabilities of the large-size equipment that UniCarriers is renowned for. And most significantly, the cumulative knowhow of all of these companies, which are now working together on a global scale under the M-FET group umbrella.
Viewed from the coastline, the blades stoically sweep against the backdrop of the horizon. Far out in the open ocean, a single wind turbine is a spectacular monolith. Arrayed in offshore wind power plants, they push the envelope of human ingenuity. Over the years offshore wind turbines have become larger and more powerful, and now generate more electrical power from fewer turbines, require fewer foundations, much less electrical infrastructure and less frequent service visits, and as a result have dramatically reduced the cost of offshore wind power. In Denmark, a pioneering wind-powered nation since the 1970s, the leading edge of the offshore wind technology is being defined.

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