There are now more than 340,000 wind turbines spinning around the world and to the casual observer, they look much the same as ever. Yet appearances are deceptive. Thanks to a series of little-recognised technological advances, wind power has become far more cost-effective and prevalent than expected.
Until recently, delivering hands-on training to aircraft mechanics meant bringing trainees into a hangar to see a plane under maintenance and removing the engine’s cover to allow them to look inside. At Japan Airlines, however, trainees using HoloLens, Microsoft’s “mixed reality” headset, can observe the different parts of an aircraft engine virtually.
This year, a San Francisco-based start-up hopes to demonstrate a scanning device that could revolutionise the diagnosis of cancer and heart disease — and, eventually, read our minds.
New approaches to filtration and extracting moisture from air promise to alleviate the world’s looming water scarcity crisis.
In a village 60 miles east of Brussels, a Belgian company is fighting to launch an experiment with the future of rubbish disposal. Group Machiels, a waste management company, wants to excavate millions of tons of decades-old waste buried in one of Europe’s largest landfills and turn it into renewable energy and building materials.

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