Renewables may win most of the headlines as the future of our energy supply, but there is another arena where the battle for cleaning the environment is taking place. And, for the time being at least, it might be even more important.
Until recently, delivering hands-on training to aircraft mechanics meant bringing trainees into a hangar to see a plane under maintenance and removing the engine’s cover to allow them to look inside. At Japan Airlines, however, trainees using HoloLens, Microsoft’s “mixed reality” headset, can observe the different parts of an aircraft engine virtually.
This year, a San Francisco-based start-up hopes to demonstrate a scanning device that could revolutionise the diagnosis of cancer and heart disease — and, eventually, read our minds.
In the global fight to eradicate hunger, it’s the small, local details that make the biggest change. Smart Like, keeping the tractor moving in a straight line.
The “Internet of Things” may still be waiting for its official spot in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, but the term has been steadily picking up steam since 1999, when it was coined by Kevin Ashton, a British researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. By coincidence, 1999 was also the year that power-generation company Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) opened the first of its four remote monitoring centers that keep an eye on the gas turbines sitting at the heart of power plants.

Pages