With stringent new emissions regulations for marine transport coming into force globally in 2020, the shipping industry is preparing to clean up its act. Is there a solution that is both cost-efficient and environmentally friendly?
New approaches to filtration and extracting moisture from air promise to alleviate the world’s looming water scarcity crisis.
With the world population set to reach nearly 10bn by 2050, higher agricultural yields will be needed to meet the demand for food — just as the likely effects of climate change intensify.
Traffic congestion is a problem in almost every city in almost every country in the world; it is a truly global affliction. And despite seemingly endless incentives designed to lure people away from their cars and onto bikes, buses and trains, the problem continues to get worse.
Beside the Pan-American Highway, almost 600km (375 miles) north of Santiago, Chile’s capital, lies El Romero, the largest solar-energy plant in Latin America and among the dozen biggest in the world. Its 775,000 grey solar panels spread out across the undulating plateau of the Atacama desert as if they were sheets of water. Built at a cost of $343m by Acciona Energia, a Spanish company, last month El Romero started to be hooked up to the national grid. By April it should reach full strength, generating 196MW of electricity enough to power a city of a million people. A third of its output will be bought directly by Google’s Chilean subsidiary, and the rest fed into the grid.