As the world’s power needs grow, the search is on for better battery technology — not just to keep smartphones charged for longer, but to run electric cars and to store energy produced by solar and wind power.
As economic development has spread, cities in many emerging economies have repeated one of the key transport-policy mistakes of western countries — they have allowed space-inefficient private cars to become an important mode of transport in dense cities.
Solving climate change calls for pragmatic solutions that also address the most pressing economic and social issues of our time. With newer, more technically advanced breakthroughs in greener power generation coming into the fray, the race is on to identify the most suitable solutions and implement them in geographies and communities that need them the most.
In the early 1950s, Shenzhen in south-eastern China was a fishing village with only a few thousand inhabitants. Last year, its residents numbered around 11 million. While this may be a particularly extreme example of urban growth, the UN predicts that by 2030, two-thirds of the global population will live in cities. In many urban centers there is already a shortage of space and expanding outwards isn’t always an option.
The “Internet of Things” may still be waiting for its official spot in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, but the term has been steadily picking up steam since 1999, when it was coined by Kevin Ashton, a British researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. By coincidence, 1999 was also the year that power-generation company Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) opened the first of its four remote monitoring centers that keep an eye on the gas turbines sitting at the heart of power plants.

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