There are now more than 340,000 wind turbines spinning around the world and to the casual observer, they look much the same as ever. Yet appearances are deceptive. Thanks to a series of little-recognised technological advances, wind power has become far more cost-effective and prevalent than expected.
Our appetite for energy seems insatiable. Whether it’s to run the increasing amount of digital tech we use every day, or the rapidly growing economies of developing nations, we are all power-hungry.
If you’re one of the several billion people around the world who bought items of new clothing in the past decade, chances are at least one of your garments was made in Bangladesh.
In 2016, about 51 percent of new power capacity in the European Union came from the wind, according to energy association WindEurope. In the U.S., only around 5.5 percent of the nation’s energy came from wind power, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, up from 4.7% in 2015. And, until very recently, all of that wind had been harvested from land-based turbines.
For the past century, power producers in the United States have been driven to provide affordable, safe, and reliable electricity to the American populace. As the country becomes more aware of the consequences that come with power production, society has continued to ask for cleaner energy options to provide for our growing population and economy, while ensuring the health of our future.

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