The “Internet of Things” may still be waiting for its official spot in the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, but the term has been steadily picking up steam since 1999, when it was coined by Kevin Ashton, a British researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. By coincidence, 1999 was also the year that power-generation company Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems (MHPS) opened the first of its four remote monitoring centers that keep an eye on the gas turbines sitting at the heart of power plants.
y Keith Breene If you think of geothermal power having a national home, it is probably the frozen expanse of Iceland or perhaps the volcanic springs of New Zealand. Both countries, on opposite sides of the world, owe their famously prolific geological activity to their position on shifting tectonic plates. In fact, the region emerging as the world’s leading geothermal power is thousands of miles away from both of these countries, in the verdant hills of East Africa.
Last year 15 catastrophic weather and climate events struck, destroying property, uprooting people’s lives in the United States, causing more than $15 billion in damages. Devastating natural disasters also rolled across the globe. Earthquakes hit northeast of Rome in January and in Ecuador last spring. The devastation is unimaginable. People are left without running water or electricity for weeks on end. Hospitals and schools are closed. Water treatment centers shuttered. Power is one of the most important things needed to move down the path of recovery.