y Keith Breene If you think of geothermal power having a national home, it is probably the frozen expanse of Iceland or perhaps the volcanic springs of New Zealand. Both countries, on opposite sides of the world, owe their famously prolific geological activity to their position on shifting tectonic plates. In fact, the region emerging as the world’s leading geothermal power is thousands of miles away from both of these countries, in the verdant hills of East Africa.
Last year 15 catastrophic weather and climate events struck, destroying property, uprooting people’s lives in the United States, causing more than $15 billion in damages. Devastating natural disasters also rolled across the globe. Earthquakes hit northeast of Rome in January and in Ecuador last spring. The devastation is unimaginable. People are left without running water or electricity for weeks on end. Hospitals and schools are closed. Water treatment centers shuttered. Power is one of the most important things needed to move down the path of recovery.