In 1984, the United States proposed a project to build, in concert with international partners, a “space base where people can live” for long periods of time.
Modern civilization has evolved at a rapid pace since the beginning of the 20th century. A key factor behind this was the invention of the engine, a new device that powered vehicles and manufacturing machinery. Engines also form the core of generators that produce electricity. Even now, engines continue to evolve as the driving force in support of a comfortable society and manufacturing activities. In 1917, MHI became the first Japanese company to develop and build a diesel engine, and since then has steadfastly pioneered technologies for the reciprocating engine.*
Weather patterns are rapidly changing, creating a need for better advanced weather detection and rapid public service announcements to those at risk of an impending natural disaster. Given detailed, updated information as a storm builds up steam, quick preparations and evacuations could save lives and even reduce property damage.
Downsizing to a car with a smaller engine is being made easier by the latest turbochargers. They can transform a standard four-cylinder engine into a much more powerful motor Frugal four-cylinder engines used to be found only in the cheapest cars. But today they are being fitted to even luxury models. What has made them more acceptable indeed, desirable is the development of advanced turbochargers that cram more air than normal into the fixed volume of their cylinders, allowing the engines to burn proportionally more fuel. The result is a compact unit that punches way above its weight in terms of power and torque, a turning force which makes that power available at lower revs. These engines also provide better fuel economy and emit less pollution. 
Environment: Removing carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere could help combat climate change. Will it really work? Preventing catastrophic climate change, most people agree, will mean reducing the level of man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. That, in turn, will require the widespread use of “low carbon” technologies such as solar and wind power, more energy-efficient buildings, and so on. Some countries have pledged to reduce their greenhouse-gas emissions by 80% by 2050, and campaigners are calling for cuts of 90% or even 100%. New Zealand, Costa Rica and Norway are racing to become the world's first “carbon neutral” country. But some researchers think there might be a simpler way to reduce the level of CO2 in the atmosphere: to build “air capture” machines that, as their name suggests, grab it from the air.

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