Today manufacturing relies upon state-of-the-art technology, data and highly skilled engineers. However, the ancient Japanese principle of chowa still has a key part to play.
There is little debate that the U.S. power grid, in the years to come, will continue to be a combination of fossil fuels and renewables. This energy mix is arguably the best way to sustain the world’s growing appetite for energy, especially in places like the United States where per capita, people use much more power than any other country on earth.
It’s an exciting albeit confusing and risky age for the energy sector, as researchers turn to new sources for clean, renewable forms of energy. For the layperson, the infrastructure of solar and wind power is easy to see and perceive as “clean,” but there are a host of others that come into play, as well as behind-the-scenes infrastructural and energy logistics oriented technologies involved.
The U.S. is rich in energy supply. We are almost unique in the world in having an abundance of coal, oil and natural gas, along with exceptional wind, solar and hydropower resources in many areas of our country. At the same time, we see an increasing focus on local air quality and global climate change. My company is responding to these emerging challenges and amazing opportunities by enabling the power plant of the future.